You are here: Home

Search results for Depression

45 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type














New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
LARP and Debriefing
by Hawke Robinson published Jun 21, 2017 last modified May 14, 2018 10:47 PM — filed under: ,
Debriefing is a somewhat controversial topic in role-playing communities today. While some individuals feel that games should remain distinct from the mundane world and debriefing is an unnecessary complication, many role-players have grown concerned about difficulties in the process of transitioning between intense game experiences back to mundane life.[1]
Located in Archives / / Additional Reference Material / LARP and Bleed
Disclaimers for essays, news, blogs, etc.
by admin published Jun 18, 2015 last modified Jun 22, 2015 11:22 AM
Various disclaimers
Located in About / Disclaimers
About The RPG Research Project Community Website (All on one page).
by admin last modified Aug 15, 2017 04:25 AM — filed under: ,
This community-focused website began with efforts, starting initially around 1985, and advancing since 2004, to identify the effects of role-playing games upon participants. Furthermore research efforts consider the potential uses of RPGs as intervention modalities to achieve educational and therapeutic goals for diverse populations. RPG Research is loose consortium of contributors and completely volunteer-run.
Located in About
1994 - Use of D&D as a therapy for suicidal schizoid
by Hawke Robinson published Jan 31, 2013 last modified May 14, 2018 10:47 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Blackmon, Wayne D. (1994, Fall). Dungeons and Dragons: the use of a fantasy game in the psychotherapeutic treatment of a young adult. Journal of Psychotherapy, 48:4, 624-632.
Located in Archives / Primary Archives / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research)
psychology
by Hawke Robinson published Jun 14, 2018
Located in Archives / / Additional Reference Material / To Be Sorted
2013 RPGR-A00011b Hypothetical Therapeutic Recreation Program Plan for Clients with Traumatic Brain Injury Using Role-Playing Games as Therapy - SHORT-VERSION-20130331m-cc
by Hawke Robinson published Oct 05, 2015 last modified Aug 07, 2016 05:46 AM — filed under: ,
“Hypothetical Therapeutic Recreation Program Plan for Clients with Traumatic Brain Injury Using Role-Playing Games as Therapy” Essay (short version) - INTERVENTIONS. March 11th, 2013. The RPG Research Project. http://www.rpgresearch.com. by W.A. Hawkes-Robinson (c) 2013. Revised for Creative Commons License Release: March 31st, 2013.
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives / Project Archives
RPG Handbook Wiki Original Source Document
by Hawke Robinson published Nov 09, 2016 last modified Aug 29, 2018 05:27 AM — filed under: , ,
Here is the source document that is being converted to the wiki version of the RPG Handbook of Practice.
Located in Archives / / RPG Handbook / Wiki Version
What is D&D?
by Hawke Robinson published Apr 29, 2017 last modified Aug 22, 2017 11:37 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Dungeons and Dragons™ (commonly known as D & D™) is an elaborate fantasy game which evolved from the war games popular in the late 1950's. Instead of a historical battlefield and battle, D&D™ games are fought in the minds of the players as the DM (dungeon master, or god) sets the stage in the fantasy world. Each player assumes the identity of the character he creates. His creature is based on chance roll of the dice. Each character will have six basic abilities: strength, intelligence, wisdom, constitution, dexterity, and charisma. The manual guideline will determine whether the character will be "good" or "evil."
Located in Archives / / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research) / Full Text Documents Waiting for permission to publish publicly
Bleed: The Spillover Between Player and Character
by Hawke Robinson published Jun 21, 2017 last modified Aug 16, 2017 05:25 AM — filed under:
Participants often engage in role-playing in order to step inside the shoes of another person in a fictional reality that they consider “consequence-free.” However, role-players sometimes experience moments where their real life feelings, thoughts, relationships, and physical states spill over into their characters’ and vice versa. In role-playing studies, we call this phenomenon bleed.[1]
Located in Archives / / Additional Reference Material / LARP and Bleed
About
by Hawke Robinson published Sep 23, 2015 last modified Sep 23, 2015 06:07 PM
Here is a much longer version of the "About" page for the RPG Research Project.
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives