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1991 - Relationship of role-playing games to self-reported criminal behaviour.

by Hawke Robinson published Apr 17, 2012 10:00 AM, last modified Feb 28, 2016 11:18 PM
Abyeta, Suzanne and Forest, James (1991, December). Gamers are lower in criminal tendencies than rest of population.

Abstract

The hypothesis that role-playing experience should be positively correlated with self-reported criminality was examined. Regression analysis indicated that role-playing experience did not relate to self-reported criminality. However, Psychoticism, which was higher in the nonplayers, did predict criminality.

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