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Nominate RPG Research to Speak on: "TED Talk - Ideas Worth Spreading"

by Hawke Robinson published Jul 14, 2018 10:35 AM, last modified Jul 14, 2018 10:36 AM
An increasing number of people have been asking about how they could make it possible for us to speak on TED Talk "Ideas Worth Spreading", here is the information you requested so you can undertake the nomination process...

As per multiple requests, if you would like to see Hawke Robinson, founder of RPG Research, and President of RPG Therapeutics LLC on Ted Talk - "Ideas Worth Spreading", then please complete the following online forms asking them to do so.

Feel free to spread the word to others. The more requests they get, the more likely it will be to happen!

This is the online form you will need to complete:

TED Talk Speaker Nomination URL:
https://speaker-nominations.ted.com/

And here is some information you may find helpful in filling out the form, with links that may help you decide what to post:

Speaker
Hawke Robinson, Founder of RPG Research, President of RPG Therapeutics
LLC.

Email: rpgresearcher@gmail.com

Phone: (833) RPG-INFO ext. 710

City: Spokane, WA, USA

Gender: Male

Occupation: Washington State Department of Health Registered Recreational Therapist

Why are you recommending this person: <your own words>

If you are at all at a loss for words, you could paraphrase this from Adam Johns at Game To Grow:

"Hawke is sort of the grandfather of therapeutic gaming. He has been tracking and involved in the therapeutic and educational application of role-playing games longer than anyone else.”


Mr Robinson has been involved with Role-playing gaming since the 1970s, researching the effects of RPGs and using RPGs in educational settings since 1980s, and therapeutic RPG uses since 2004.

More About Hawke: A Washington State Department of Health Registered Recreational Therapist with a background in music & recreation therapy, therapeutic recreation, research psychology, neuroscience, and computer science.


What speak about?
Many possible topics to pick from:

  • The myths & realities about role-playing gamers.
  • The effects of all RPG 4 RPG formats, and their effective use for
  • education and therapy for many different populations.
  • Optimizing RPGs for maximum potential flow state experience.
  • Establishing standards of professional role-playing gaming.
  • Important adaptive considerations of RPGs and RPG events for Deaf,
  • Visually Impaired, or people with other disabilities.

 

Use of RPGs to achieve professional, educational, recreational, or therapeutic goals for any of the following populations:

  • Autism spectrum
  • At-risk youth
  • Brain-injury
  • Muscular dystrophy,
  • Cognitive decline from aging
  • Incarcerated youth & adults
  • Substance dependency rehabilitation transition
  • Social phobias
  • Social skills development
  • and many others.


Categories: Science/Medicine, Education, Other

Previously spoken publicly list:

  • WorldCon 73
  • Seattle Children's Hospital
  • Wizards of the Coast Dungeons & Dragons "Dragon Talk"
  • Eastern Washington University
  • Washington State Therapeutic Recreation Association conferences
  • Pacific Northwest American Therapeutic Recreation Association conferences
  • SpoCon
  • ZoeCon
  • FanNexus
  • Texas State University, Living Games Conference
  • & many others


Video links:


Articles about speaker:

Wizards of the Coast Dungeons & Dragons:
http://dnd.wizards.com/articles/features/hawke-robinson-rpg-research

VICE Media:
https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/yvx4zb/at-this-danish-school-larping-is-the-future-of-education-482

The Columbia Chronicle:
http://www.columbiachronicle.com/arts_and_culture/article_9706e6ee-cf10-11e7-b35e-636cd3e15551.html

Kill Screen:
https://killscreen.com/articles/dungeons-mind-tabletop-rpgs-social-therapy/




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