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Dungeons and Dragons™ and other fantasy role-playing games
by Hawke Robinson published Feb 25, 2013 last modified Mar 26, 2018 02:26 PM — filed under: , , , , , ,
This page is a cached copy of the page at http://www.religioustolerance.org/d_a_d.htm a copy has been made for the reader's convenience. Please note that the page may have changed since this snapshot was taken. RPG Research and rpgresearch.com and rpgr.org (and affiliate sites) are not affiliated with the authors of this page and is not responsible for its content.
Located in Archives / / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research) / Archives
RPG Recreation Therapy Hypothetical Scenario - Bipolar Clients in Complex Interpersonal Interactions
by Hawke Robinson published Feb 25, 2013 last modified May 10, 2016 11:15 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
As we continue through the course on Recreation Therapy for People with Disabilities at Eastern Washington University, we have various assignments to write up hypothetical scenarios with hypothetical clients. This is one with several types of scenarios with hypothetical bipolar clients using tabletop role-playing gaming as the core activity. This is a high level overview, rather than a detailed activity analysis.
Located in Blog
1988 - Therapy is fantasy: role-playing, healing, and the construction of symbolic order.
by Hawke Robinson published Nov 19, 2012 last modified May 14, 2018 03:46 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , , ,
Hughes, John (1988). Therapy is fantasy: role-playing, healing, and the construction of symbolic order. Australian National University honors paper in medical anthropology on the use of RPG in the self-treatment of clinical depression. 23 pages.
Located in Archives / / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research) / Archives
2000 - Dungeons, dragons and gender: role-playing games and the participation of women
by Hawke Robinson published Apr 17, 2012 last modified Aug 22, 2017 04:35 PM — filed under: , , , , , , ,
Foster, Kyna (2000, March 30). Dungeons, dragons and gender: role-playing games and the participation of women. 42nd meeting of the Western Social Sciences Association (online). Stereotypes in RPG. 11 pages.
Located in Archives / Primary Archives / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research)
2007 - RPGR-A00007-part 1 - RPG Adapted for the Deaf Using ASL
by Hawke Robinson published Dec 12, 2011 last modified May 10, 2016 11:14 AM — filed under: , , ,
“Hands-On-Adventure” - (ASL signed role playing gaming) - Role-Playing Gaming Adapted for the Deaf Using - American Sign Language - by W.A. Hawkes-Robinson - (c) 2007 - Revised for Creative Commons 2012-10-01
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives / Project Archives
2008 - RPGR-A00004 Role-playing Games Used as Educational and Therapeutic Tools for Youth and Adults
by Hawke Robinson published Dec 10, 2008 last modified Jan 11, 2016 03:58 PM — filed under: ,
by W.A. Hawkes-Robinson - Original Version 2008-12-10 - Revised 2011-12-06 - Revised for release under Creative Commons: 2012-09-30
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives / Project Archives
2007 - RPGR-A00006 - The Battle Over Role Playing Gaming
by Hawke Robinson published Jun 29, 2007 last modified Jan 11, 2016 03:56 PM — filed under: ,
Other Minds Magazine Version - by W.A. Hawkes-Robinson.
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives / Project Archives
2004 - RPGR-A00001 An Overview of the History and Potential Therapeutic Value of Role-playing Gaming
by Hawke Robinson published Sep 30, 2004 last modified Jan 11, 2016 03:54 PM — filed under: , ,
Role-playing gaming (RPGing) has its roots as far back as ancient history with the development of war-gaming. War-gaming is the simulation of combat strategies and tactics represented in reduced scale with various rules, often with some sort of randomizing agent such as dice or cards to add an element of “realistic” unpredictability. As long as there has been organized warfare, there appears to have been some form of war-gaming in every culture throughout history. Chess and the Chinese game Go both are very much based on war-gaming, but considered lacking by some because of the lack of unpredictability offered by “true” war-gaming using some degree of randomization. The RPG Research Project Document ID #RPGR-A001-A-20120927A-CC
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives / Project Archives