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Optimizing the RPG Experience for Building Camaraderie As Quickly and Strongly as possible
by Hawke Robinson published Sep 08, 2017 last modified Jun 13, 2018 05:12 PM — filed under: , ,
Drawing on Therapeutic Recreation theories, methodologies, and protocols, there are a number of "ice breaking" techniques when forming new groups, to help improve building camaraderie. Also taking into account Tuckman's theories on group formation (Forming, Storming, Norming, Performing (Adjourning/Mourning)). This article combines all those concepts with using role-playing games to achieve these goals, and techniques for optimizing the RPG experience to improve this process, as well as some examples of games that build some aspects into their systems. This is a work in progress.
Located in Blog
Post LARP Depression
by Hawke Robinson published Jun 21, 2017 last modified Jun 21, 2020 06:29 AM — filed under: ,
Live-action role-playing (larp) occupies a unique place among analog games, for it demands as much from players’ bodies as it does from their minds. It comes then as no surprise that many players find themselves in the situation of feeling confused, exhausted, and emotionally raw after a larp event.1 In fact, larpers frequently exhaust themselves in advance through the leisure labor of planning their costumes, character actions, possible outcomes, and interactions...
Located in Archives / / Additional Reference Material / LARP and Bleed
2004 - RPGR-A00001 An Overview of the History and Potential Therapeutic Value of Role-playing Gaming
by Hawke Robinson published Sep 30, 2004 last modified Jun 07, 2020 12:20 PM — filed under: , ,
Role-playing gaming (RPGing) has its roots as far back as ancient history with the development of war-gaming. War-gaming is the simulation of combat strategies and tactics represented in reduced scale with various rules, often with some sort of randomizing agent such as dice or cards to add an element of “realistic” unpredictability. As long as there has been organized warfare, there appears to have been some form of war-gaming in every culture throughout history. Chess and the Chinese game Go both are very much based on war-gaming, but considered lacking by some because of the lack of unpredictability offered by “true” war-gaming using some degree of randomization. The RPG Research Project Document ID #RPGR-A001-A-20120927A-CC
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives / Project Archives
About The RPG Research Project Community Website (All on one page).
by admin last modified Aug 14, 2017 09:25 PM — filed under: ,
This community-focused website began with efforts, starting initially around 1985, and advancing since 2004, to identify the effects of role-playing games upon participants. Furthermore research efforts consider the potential uses of RPGs as intervention modalities to achieve educational and therapeutic goals for diverse populations. RPG Research is loose consortium of contributors and completely volunteer-run.
Located in About
LARP and Debriefing
by Hawke Robinson published Jun 21, 2017 last modified Jun 21, 2020 08:26 AM — filed under: ,
Debriefing is a somewhat controversial topic in role-playing communities today. While some individuals feel that games should remain distinct from the mundane world and debriefing is an unnecessary complication, many role-players have grown concerned about difficulties in the process of transitioning between intense game experiences back to mundane life.[1]
Located in Archives / / Additional Reference Material / LARP and Bleed
Bleed: The Spillover Between Player and Character
by Hawke Robinson published Jun 21, 2017 last modified Aug 09, 2020 02:40 PM — filed under:
Participants often engage in role-playing in order to step inside the shoes of another person in a fictional reality that they consider “consequence-free.” However, role-players sometimes experience moments where their real life feelings, thoughts, relationships, and physical states spill over into their characters’ and vice versa. In role-playing studies, we call this phenomenon bleed.[1]
Located in Archives / / Additional Reference Material / LARP and Bleed
About
by Hawke Robinson published Sep 23, 2015 last modified Sep 23, 2015 11:07 AM
Here is a much longer version of the "About" page for the RPG Research Project.
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives
Notes from experiments on RPG optimization - Maximizing enjoyment, benefit, immersion, flow, safety, etc.
by Hawke Robinson published May 25, 2017 last modified Jun 27, 2020 03:50 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Here is a summary of many observations I have made over the decades through various experiments in trying to optimize the RPG experience. This is from a huge pile of hundreds of documents I have written, spanning over 15+ years of research (and nearly 40 years of RPG experience). It will likely take me a year or more to finish integrating all that information into this document. All of the placeholder topics I currently have documents to fill in the blanks, but I time is the challenge in doing so. Bit by bit I am uploading all that content to here.
Located in Blog
Fine, Gary Alan (1989). Mobilizing Fun: Provisioning Resources in Leisure Worlds. Sociology of Sport Journal, 6, 319 334.
by Hawke Robinson published Jun 13, 2018
Located in Archives / / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research) / Full Text Documents Waiting for permission to publish publicly
1999 - New texts and new media in global youth culture: the fantasy roleplaying games.
by Hawke Robinson published Apr 25, 2005 last modified Sep 17, 2015 06:10 AM — filed under: , , , , , , ,
Sørensen, Anne Scott (1999). New texts and new media in global youth culture: the fantasy roleplaying games. Young, vol. 7, no. 3. <http://www.alli.fi/nyri/young/1999/articleS%F8rensen99-3.htm>. Psychological and sociological study from interviews with 13-16 year old boys in Danish game club. Warning: heavy use of jargon. 10 pages. [No longer online.]
Located in Archives / Primary Archives / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research)