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Key Essays, Presentations, and Research from RPG Research
by Hawke Robinson published Jan 06, 2018 last modified Jan 06, 2018 12:42 PM — filed under: , ,
Here is a list of some of the most asked for research content created by RPG Research founder Hawke Robinson. There are hundreds of other research pieces on this site, but these are a good starting point for many.
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Comment Standardization of systems/settings for research, therapies, and education
by Hawke Robinson last modified May 19, 2017 05:51 PM
Here is the current thinking/status. While I have many favorite systems that are out of print, if we are going to have clients learn a system, it would be better if it is a system they can buy and continue even after discharge (part of the Therapeutic Recreation methodology), so they can continue "treatment" benefits on their own. We want combinations of systems and settings that have built into the rules strong encouragement for "good" (desired) behaviors, and discouragement for "bad" (undesired) behaviors (typical to "murder hobos", "chaos players", etc.). For Fantasy RPG, we are for now standardizing on Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition for training people how to use RPGs as just a basic fundamental skill set, but with recommendations to build further upon that base platform. This includes RPG Therapeutics intro level workshops. For RPG Therapeutics education and especially therapeutic programs that we provide, we are standardizing on Adventures in Middle-earth (AiMe) D&D 5e + TOR. This systems & setting combination provides an ideal combination that is published and accessible for people to buy and continue on their own, that has strong capacities for behavior modification built into the system (shadow points, fellowship, etc.). I really like TOR, in some ways more than AiMe, but we'll try AiMe with some TOR add-ons for a while. I would like to do some play testing with groups running pure TOR, and groups running AiMe+ TOR, and groups running straight AiMe, and see which looks closer to meeting our/clients long term goals. TOR is a great system, but D&D is of course the "lingua franca" of the RPG community so much easier for discharged clients to find other groups to play the same system, versus the rarity of TOR groups, alas. For Science Fiction System/Setting, I am thinking possibly Babylon 5, though I really like the setting for Serenity/Firefly (I like Serenity's version of the Cortex system a lot more than Firefly's revised overly abstract version). Both systems very much take on heavy, complicated issues of right and wrong, consequences to behaviors, etc. The currently published B5 system is based on Traveller, while the first B5 system was its own (though with some nice features), but most of the content available is from the in-between versions using d20 3.x based (but much more deadly for combat than normal 3.x). Since B5 is heavily based on Tolkien, and has such a rich setting, and with The 4 big questions built into it, that apply not only to the game, but also to the players: Who are you? What do you want? Where are you going? Why are here? Of course there are Star Wars, Star Trek, Stargate SG-1 (REALLY good system for whipping up worlds and adventures quickly on the fly, though it is d20 3.x (I see that as a con)), and others. Star Wars & Star Trek are the mostly widely known settings, though more recent versions are a lot more fluff and action, and lacking in a lot fo ways, but in an RPG setting this could possibly be improved. Though I own it, I haven't actually run the newer Star Wars system, I mostly ran the old d6 version (and enjoyed). I liked the old FASA Star Trek better than the later versions, but of course those are not only long out of print, but very difficult to track down. Any other better Science Fiction settings/systems folks could suggest, that are as accessible as Middle-earth is to Fantasy, and with a decent system that includes behavior modification and encouragement to play more "heroic" type play and discourage "murder hobo" chaos player styles, built into the system and setting the way TOR and AiMe are? For horror, I am thinking Call of Cthulhu, latest d6 version, 1920s setting (though all the other settings are an option, including modern)? I don't think Vampire/Werewold/World of Darkness/Etc is a very appropriate system/setting for most of our clientelle, though for research it is of course interesting to consider. For Super Heroes, ? I am thinking maybe something like Agents of Shield setting from our existing program plans, but what system? For a Western system, I'm not aware of anything that is truly a straight western cowboy style system since Boot Hill. Anyone have any other suggestions? For murder mystery type? Historical system/settings? Modern military system/settings? (I really like Twilight 200, but doesn't meet criteria for being published, and doesn't have built-in behavioral tools alas). Other genres? I look forward to everyone's suggestions. Happy Gaming! -Hawke        
Located in Community Discussion / / The RPG Research Project Discussion / Standardization of systems/settings for research, therapies, and education
Avista (Energy Company) Worker and RPG Research Discussion on RPG-based Professional Training
by Hawke Robinson published Jul 25, 2016 last modified Jul 25, 2016 12:31 PM — filed under: , , ,
I just had a surprising dialog with some Avista (my local power company) workers regarding role-playing games...
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Michael Tresca Interview of RPG Research's Hawke Robinson - Part 3 of 3
by Hawke Robinson published Oct 12, 2015 last modified Oct 15, 2015 08:29 PM — filed under: ,
Hawke Robinson is founder and Primary Investigator for The RPG Research Project, and the creation of the RPG Trailer. Michael Tresca: "I've known Hawke Robinson, Washington State registered Recreation Therapist (#RE60526204) for some time but haven't gotten a chance to interview him before." This is part 3 of 3 parts to this interview...
Located in Archives / / Project Archives / Interviews
2011 - "It's like my life but more, and better!" -- Playing with the Cathaby Shark Girls: MMORPGs, young people and Fantasy-based social play
by Hawke Robinson published Feb 29, 2016
"It's like my life but more, and better!" -- Playing with the Cathaby Shark Girls: MMORPGs, young people and Fantasy-based social play Crowe, NicView Profile. International Journal of Adolescence and Youth16.2 (2011): 201-223.
Located in Archives / Primary Archives / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research)
Preview Review of Adventures in Middle-earth Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition Player's Guide
by Hawke Robinson published Dec 12, 2016 last modified Dec 12, 2016 11:20 AM
The creators of The One Ring Role-Playing Game (TOR), have created the first licensed D&D-based Middle-earth RPG, "Adventures in Middle-earth". Here is a preview from a decades-long Tolkien-based gamer. While I received the PDFs many months ago, I finally received the hard copies of the d20 Tolkien RPG System based on The One Ring (TOR) by Cubicle 7: "Adventures in Middle-earth Players guide" for 5th Edition Dungeons & Dragons. Definitely plan for this to be at Tolkien Moot XIII!
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2008 - RPGR-A00004 Role-playing Games Used as Educational and Therapeutic Tools for Youth and Adults
by Hawke Robinson published Dec 10, 2008 last modified Jan 11, 2016 03:58 PM — filed under: ,
by W.A. Hawkes-Robinson - Original Version 2008-12-10 - Revised 2011-12-06 - Revised for release under Creative Commons: 2012-09-30
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives / Project Archives
Doeseasydoit
by admin published Jun 21, 2017 — filed under:
Located in Archives / / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research) / Full Text Documents Waiting for permission to publish publicly
1982 - Activity Structure as Scaffolding for Children's Second Language Learning. Sociolinguistic Working Paper Number 100.
by Hawke Robinson published Feb 29, 2016 last modified May 24, 2020 11:17 AM
Activity Structure as Scaffolding for Children's Second Language Learning. Sociolinguistic Working Paper Number 100. Ervin-Tripp, Susan M.View Profile; Southwest Educational Development Lab., Austin, TX.. November 1982: 38
Located in Archives / Primary Archives / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research)
File PDF document PNWATRA 2016 RPG Research Presentation 1 20160125zw
by Hawke Robinson last modified Jan 28, 2016 11:18 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , , ,
Updated to version zu, to include Education program plan for ADD/ADHD IDEA IEP, and relevant Dendy references entry. Zv version includes additional slides with the scan of added BADD pamphlet with "suicide" list, and locations banning D&D. Zw version, added missing APA reference, and Stumbo references. Zx version, added quick reference to Gender Bias research. This is a greatly enriched, and updated version of last year's presentation at WSTRA in April. With more time spent on the actual program plans as per requests from feedback last time. I know it is still blindingly long for a presentation file, but I've worked out the timing to finish comfortably in about 75-80 minutes (I can always easily stretch that longer if needed), leaving 5-10 minutes for Q&A, so won't have to do such a rushed presentation as last time. The slide show includes a lot of extra information for those wanting to peruse more deeply after the presentation itself. Especially the research abstracts, citation references, and information on my background, etc. All of which I will only very briefly point out and skim during the presentation, rather than spending time during the presentation itself, but it is there for those skeptical about the statements being made, hopefully it will help. I am hoping this will be the most effective approach to show the level of research performed, without having to try to prove it during the presentation itself. I am working on a VERY short version, around the 7-15 minutes mark as per Professor Bowman's suggestions/requirements for The Living Games conference (and others where I do not have the luxury of a 90 minute session). Fortunately, for conventions with gamers (rather than Therapeutic Recreation), I don't really have to explain what RPGs are, and their history. For the TR folks that mostly don't even know what it is (the younger ones), or often have the inculcated misconceptions (the older ones), this longer approach makes for a much more productive session. Otherwise the Q&A just gets bogged down on the all the myths, rather than the focus on RPGs for TR modality.
Located in Archives / / Project Archives / Video, Audio, & Presentations by RPG Research