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pulling report
by Hawke Robinson published Mar 21, 2019
Located in Archives / / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research) / Full Text Documents Waiting for permission to publish publicly
Shared Storytelling:
by Hawke Robinson published Mar 21, 2019
Located in Archives / / Additional Reference Material / To Be Sorted
eflrpg
by Hawke Robinson published Mar 21, 2019
Located in Archives / / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research) / Full Text Documents Waiting for permission to publish publicly
RPG Research Projects History List
by Hawke Robinson published Apr 30, 2018 last modified May 01, 2018 10:47 AM — filed under: , ,
While we have posted textual and photo lists of the history of RPG Research at a high level, we haven't created an organized list, in timeline approach, of the actual research we've performed since 1983.
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives
Professional Ethics, Friendly vs. Friends
by Hawke Robinson published Apr 06, 2018 last modified Jul 24, 2020 05:27 PM — filed under: ,
This came up in an Alignable social network thread, and I thought others might enjoy it being shared here. "What do you think is an appropriate relationship with a client/customer? " This also addresses some of the topics of RPG Professionals / Paid Game Masters, etc.
Located in Blog
2003 - Shared Storytelling: Utilizing Role-Playing Games In Social Skills Assessment and Intervention
by John Welker published Nov 27, 2017 last modified Jun 13, 2018 11:49 PM — filed under: , ,
2003 James D. Persinger, Ph.D. Problem: Assessment of the social domain = Standardized Rating Scales •Interviews and observations may better connect to practical intervention. •Role-playing games (RPGs) have the qualities of both interview and observation •RPGs not only serve as assessment tools, but as a powerful intervention tool for practicing social skills.
Located in Archives / Primary Archives / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research)
guide
by Hawke Robinson published Aug 30, 2017
Located in Archives / / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research) / Full Text Documents Waiting for permission to publish publicly
Old Research Repository
by Hawke Robinson published Aug 16, 2017 last modified Mar 21, 2019 02:48 PM
This is RPG Research's older research repository. We are currently moving more than 3,000 content items (1 multi-page essay equals 1 content item) from this old site to our new repository at www.rpgresearch.com/research . The new repository is better organized and formatted, but it takes months for our volunteers to move all this content from the old site to the new site, so we are keeping the old repository available until the move is complete. All new research is being added to the new repository, no new research is being added to this old repository as of 2018.
Safety and Calibration LARP Mechanics
by Hawke Robinson published Jun 21, 2017 last modified Aug 09, 2020 02:38 PM — filed under:
Creating a Culture of Trust through Safety and Calibration Larp Mechanics
Located in Archives / / Additional Reference Material / LARP and Bleed
Comment Standardization of systems/settings for research, therapies, and education
by Hawke Robinson last modified May 19, 2017 05:51 PM
Here is the current thinking/status. While I have many favorite systems that are out of print, if we are going to have clients learn a system, it would be better if it is a system they can buy and continue even after discharge (part of the Therapeutic Recreation methodology), so they can continue "treatment" benefits on their own. We want combinations of systems and settings that have built into the rules strong encouragement for "good" (desired) behaviors, and discouragement for "bad" (undesired) behaviors (typical to "murder hobos", "chaos players", etc.). For Fantasy RPG, we are for now standardizing on Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition for training people how to use RPGs as just a basic fundamental skill set, but with recommendations to build further upon that base platform. This includes RPG Therapeutics intro level workshops. For RPG Therapeutics education and especially therapeutic programs that we provide, we are standardizing on Adventures in Middle-earth (AiMe) D&D 5e + TOR. This systems & setting combination provides an ideal combination that is published and accessible for people to buy and continue on their own, that has strong capacities for behavior modification built into the system (shadow points, fellowship, etc.). I really like TOR, in some ways more than AiMe, but we'll try AiMe with some TOR add-ons for a while. I would like to do some play testing with groups running pure TOR, and groups running AiMe+ TOR, and groups running straight AiMe, and see which looks closer to meeting our/clients long term goals. TOR is a great system, but D&D is of course the "lingua franca" of the RPG community so much easier for discharged clients to find other groups to play the same system, versus the rarity of TOR groups, alas. For Science Fiction System/Setting, I am thinking possibly Babylon 5, though I really like the setting for Serenity/Firefly (I like Serenity's version of the Cortex system a lot more than Firefly's revised overly abstract version). Both systems very much take on heavy, complicated issues of right and wrong, consequences to behaviors, etc. The currently published B5 system is based on Traveller, while the first B5 system was its own (though with some nice features), but most of the content available is from the in-between versions using d20 3.x based (but much more deadly for combat than normal 3.x). Since B5 is heavily based on Tolkien, and has such a rich setting, and with The 4 big questions built into it, that apply not only to the game, but also to the players: Who are you? What do you want? Where are you going? Why are here? Of course there are Star Wars, Star Trek, Stargate SG-1 (REALLY good system for whipping up worlds and adventures quickly on the fly, though it is d20 3.x (I see that as a con)), and others. Star Wars & Star Trek are the mostly widely known settings, though more recent versions are a lot more fluff and action, and lacking in a lot fo ways, but in an RPG setting this could possibly be improved. Though I own it, I haven't actually run the newer Star Wars system, I mostly ran the old d6 version (and enjoyed). I liked the old FASA Star Trek better than the later versions, but of course those are not only long out of print, but very difficult to track down. Any other better Science Fiction settings/systems folks could suggest, that are as accessible as Middle-earth is to Fantasy, and with a decent system that includes behavior modification and encouragement to play more "heroic" type play and discourage "murder hobo" chaos player styles, built into the system and setting the way TOR and AiMe are? For horror, I am thinking Call of Cthulhu, latest d6 version, 1920s setting (though all the other settings are an option, including modern)? I don't think Vampire/Werewold/World of Darkness/Etc is a very appropriate system/setting for most of our clientelle, though for research it is of course interesting to consider. For Super Heroes, ? I am thinking maybe something like Agents of Shield setting from our existing program plans, but what system? For a Western system, I'm not aware of anything that is truly a straight western cowboy style system since Boot Hill. Anyone have any other suggestions? For murder mystery type? Historical system/settings? Modern military system/settings? (I really like Twilight 200, but doesn't meet criteria for being published, and doesn't have built-in behavioral tools alas). Other genres? I look forward to everyone's suggestions. Happy Gaming! -Hawke        
Located in Community Discussion / / The RPG Research Project Discussion / Standardization of systems/settings for research, therapies, and education