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Create Adventure Modules for Specific Client Needs, such as PTSD, Depression, Autism, Traumatic Brain Injury Recovery, and others
by Hawke Robinson published Nov 02, 2004 last modified Jan 15, 2021 04:53 PM — filed under: , ,
Experiment with creating “adventure modules” specifically designed to address targeted population needs such as socialization issues between different groups.
Located in Blog
Determine if any Controllable Variables That Can Lead to Using Role-playing Games as a Therapeutic Modality
by Hawke Robinson published Nov 01, 2004 last modified Aug 14, 2015 07:46 PM — filed under: , ,
Determine if there are any controllable, repeatable "positive" or "negative", statistically significant characteristics of role-playing gaming sessions that can clearly be defined and controlled, and might be most useful to using role-playing games for specific therapeutic treatments, either separately or in conjunction with other therapy modalities.
Located in Blog
2004 - RPGR-A00001 An Overview of the History and Potential Therapeutic Value of Role-playing Gaming
by Hawke Robinson published Sep 30, 2004 last modified Jun 12, 2021 07:23 AM — filed under: , , ,
Role-playing gaming (RPGing) has its roots as far back as ancient history with the development of war-gaming. War-gaming is the simulation of combat strategies and tactics represented in reduced scale with various rules, often with some sort of randomizing agent such as dice or cards to add an element of “realistic” unpredictability. As long as there has been organized warfare, there appears to have been some form of war-gaming in every culture throughout history. Chess and the Chinese game Go both are very much based on war-gaming, but considered lacking by some because of the lack of unpredictability offered by “true” war-gaming using some degree of randomization. The RPG Research Project Document ID #RPGR-A001-A-20120927A-CC
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives / Project Archives