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2004 - RPGR-A00001 An Overview of the History and Potential Therapeutic Value of Role-playing Gaming
by Hawke Robinson published Sep 30, 2004 last modified Jan 11, 2016 03:54 PM — filed under: , ,
Role-playing gaming (RPGing) has its roots as far back as ancient history with the development of war-gaming. War-gaming is the simulation of combat strategies and tactics represented in reduced scale with various rules, often with some sort of randomizing agent such as dice or cards to add an element of “realistic” unpredictability. As long as there has been organized warfare, there appears to have been some form of war-gaming in every culture throughout history. Chess and the Chinese game Go both are very much based on war-gaming, but considered lacking by some because of the lack of unpredictability offered by “true” war-gaming using some degree of randomization. The RPG Research Project Document ID #RPGR-A001-A-20120927A-CC
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives / Project Archives
2006 (Video) - RPGR-A00007-part-2 - RPG Adapted for Deaf Using ASL Flyer
by Hawke Robinson published Dec 12, 2011 last modified May 26, 2016 09:50 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
Role-Playing Gaming Adapted for the Deaf Using American Sign Language Flyer by W.A. Hawkes-Robinson
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives / Project Archives
2007 - RPGR-A00002 The Potential Benefits and Deficits of Role-Playing Gaming
by Hawke Robinson published Sep 30, 2015 last modified Jan 11, 2016 03:57 PM — filed under: , ,
by W.A. Hawkes-Robinson Original Version April 10, 2007 Updated for Creative Commons September 27th, 2012. RPG Research Project Document ID: #RPGR-A00002-D-20120927.CC
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives / Project Archives
2008 - RPGR-A00003 - The Defamation of Role-playing Gaming and Gamers.
by Hawke Robinson published Sep 29, 2015 last modified Jan 11, 2016 03:57 PM — filed under: , ,
By W.A. Hawkes-Robison Original Version 2008-11-20 Version 2 2008-12-06 Version 3 2011-12-09 Updated for Creative Commons License: 2012-09-29
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives / Project Archives
File QuickTime video 2015 (Video) - RPGR - RPGR-A00015a
by Hawke Robinson last modified May 10, 2016 11:15 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Video of Hawke speaking at WorldCOn 73 on "Gaming for Education, Gaming for Therapy", August 19th, 2015.
Located in Archives / The RPG Research Project Specific Archives / Project Archives
Confirmed: Writing entire chapter on RPG for 4th edition textbook "Facilitation Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation"
by Hawke Robinson published May 25, 2017 last modified Aug 28, 2018 09:24 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , , ,
Wonderful news, I just received an email today confirming they wish for me to proceed with writing the entire chapter on using role-playing games as a facilitation technique for therapeutic recreation!
Located in Blog
DUNGEONS OF THE MIND: TABLETOP RPGS AS SOCIAL THERAPY
by Hawke Robinson published Oct 25, 2016 — filed under: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
An article on Killscreen.com, "DUNGEONS OF THE MIND: TABLETOP RPGS AS SOCIAL THERAPY" by Chris Berg was just published. It includes a range of RPG researchers and therapists from a variety of disciplines including: drama therapy, family therapy, sociology, recreation therapy / therapeutic recreation, and more!
Located in Blog
Escapism and Gaming
by Hawke Robinson published Jun 18, 2016 last modified Jun 21, 2017 08:54 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , ,
The arguments about "Escapism" often recur, and I recently saw someone posting about it again. This topic is addressed in the presentations at Washington State and Pacific Northwest American Therapeutic Recreation Association Conferences, so here is a snippet on the topic...
Located in Blog
Interdisciplinary RPG Therapeutics
by Hawke Robinson published Aug 11, 2016 last modified Aug 11, 2016 06:28 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , , , ,
While listening to some research on neurological music therapy program descriptions, I was struck by the overlap of the RPG Therapy programs as a very interdisciplinary delivery of services...
Located in Blog
File PDF document PNWATRA 2016 RPG Research Presentation 1 20160125zw
by Hawke Robinson last modified Jan 28, 2016 11:18 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , , ,
Updated to version zu, to include Education program plan for ADD/ADHD IDEA IEP, and relevant Dendy references entry. Zv version includes additional slides with the scan of added BADD pamphlet with "suicide" list, and locations banning D&D. Zw version, added missing APA reference, and Stumbo references. Zx version, added quick reference to Gender Bias research. This is a greatly enriched, and updated version of last year's presentation at WSTRA in April. With more time spent on the actual program plans as per requests from feedback last time. I know it is still blindingly long for a presentation file, but I've worked out the timing to finish comfortably in about 75-80 minutes (I can always easily stretch that longer if needed), leaving 5-10 minutes for Q&A, so won't have to do such a rushed presentation as last time. The slide show includes a lot of extra information for those wanting to peruse more deeply after the presentation itself. Especially the research abstracts, citation references, and information on my background, etc. All of which I will only very briefly point out and skim during the presentation, rather than spending time during the presentation itself, but it is there for those skeptical about the statements being made, hopefully it will help. I am hoping this will be the most effective approach to show the level of research performed, without having to try to prove it during the presentation itself. I am working on a VERY short version, around the 7-15 minutes mark as per Professor Bowman's suggestions/requirements for The Living Games conference (and others where I do not have the luxury of a 90 minute session). Fortunately, for conventions with gamers (rather than Therapeutic Recreation), I don't really have to explain what RPGs are, and their history. For the TR folks that mostly don't even know what it is (the younger ones), or often have the inculcated misconceptions (the older ones), this longer approach makes for a much more productive session. Otherwise the Q&A just gets bogged down on the all the myths, rather than the focus on RPGs for TR modality.
Located in Archives / / Project Archives / Video, Audio, & Presentations by RPG Research