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litlist
by Hawke Robinson published Aug 01, 2017 last modified May 14, 2018 03:48 PM
Located in Archives / / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research) / Full Text Documents Waiting for permission to publish publicly
GeekCulture An Annotated Interdisciplinary Bibliography
by admin published Jun 21, 2017 — filed under: , , , , , , ,
Sure games are fun. Yet the play that's built into them does not make them false; it makes them psychologically truer even than everyday life. Games can Solve major crises, train war heroes, and civilize us all. What the world needs is not less time for playing games but more.
Located in Archives / / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research) / Full Text Documents Waiting for permission to publish publicly
2014 - Experiences of Hobby Game Players: Motivations Behind Playing Digital and Non Digital Games | GrogHeads
by admin published Jun 21, 2017 last modified Jun 13, 2018 11:20 PM — filed under: ,
Central to our understanding of why people play digital games (either video or computer games) is to understand the reason people want to “play” a game in the first place. Playing, once reserved for only real-life interactions among people, is now the venue for interacting with digital manifestations of reality; but the question remains, is this digital-based playing different than real-based playing? The purpose of this study was to investigate the patterns of motivation and usage by card, role-playing, computer, and board game players, known in this study as hobby game players. Through an online survey, we measured the reasons people play these games, as well as the milieu in which they play these games are played. What does the game player like in a game? Why does the gamer like this? What motivates continued game play and preferences for types of games? The results indicate that digital game playing shares several underlying motivations with its pre-digital predecessors, but in ways that are still different than tabletop gaming.
Located in Archives / / Additional Reference Material / To Be Sorted
Safety and Calibration LARP Mechanics
by Hawke Robinson published Jun 21, 2017 last modified Aug 09, 2020 02:38 PM — filed under:
Creating a Culture of Trust through Safety and Calibration Larp Mechanics
Located in Archives / / Additional Reference Material / LARP and Bleed
Notes from experiments on RPG optimization - Maximizing enjoyment, benefit, immersion, flow, safety, etc.
by Hawke Robinson published May 25, 2017 last modified Jun 27, 2020 03:50 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Here is a summary of many observations I have made over the decades through various experiments in trying to optimize the RPG experience. This is from a huge pile of hundreds of documents I have written, spanning over 15+ years of research (and nearly 40 years of RPG experience). It will likely take me a year or more to finish integrating all that information into this document. All of the placeholder topics I currently have documents to fill in the blanks, but I time is the challenge in doing so. Bit by bit I am uploading all that content to here.
Located in Blog
Comment Standardization of systems/settings for research, therapies, and education
by Hawke Robinson last modified May 19, 2017 05:51 PM
Here is the current thinking/status. While I have many favorite systems that are out of print, if we are going to have clients learn a system, it would be better if it is a system they can buy and continue even after discharge (part of the Therapeutic Recreation methodology), so they can continue "treatment" benefits on their own. We want combinations of systems and settings that have built into the rules strong encouragement for "good" (desired) behaviors, and discouragement for "bad" (undesired) behaviors (typical to "murder hobos", "chaos players", etc.). For Fantasy RPG, we are for now standardizing on Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition for training people how to use RPGs as just a basic fundamental skill set, but with recommendations to build further upon that base platform. This includes RPG Therapeutics intro level workshops. For RPG Therapeutics education and especially therapeutic programs that we provide, we are standardizing on Adventures in Middle-earth (AiMe) D&D 5e + TOR. This systems & setting combination provides an ideal combination that is published and accessible for people to buy and continue on their own, that has strong capacities for behavior modification built into the system (shadow points, fellowship, etc.). I really like TOR, in some ways more than AiMe, but we'll try AiMe with some TOR add-ons for a while. I would like to do some play testing with groups running pure TOR, and groups running AiMe+ TOR, and groups running straight AiMe, and see which looks closer to meeting our/clients long term goals. TOR is a great system, but D&D is of course the "lingua franca" of the RPG community so much easier for discharged clients to find other groups to play the same system, versus the rarity of TOR groups, alas. For Science Fiction System/Setting, I am thinking possibly Babylon 5, though I really like the setting for Serenity/Firefly (I like Serenity's version of the Cortex system a lot more than Firefly's revised overly abstract version). Both systems very much take on heavy, complicated issues of right and wrong, consequences to behaviors, etc. The currently published B5 system is based on Traveller, while the first B5 system was its own (though with some nice features), but most of the content available is from the in-between versions using d20 3.x based (but much more deadly for combat than normal 3.x). Since B5 is heavily based on Tolkien, and has such a rich setting, and with The 4 big questions built into it, that apply not only to the game, but also to the players: Who are you? What do you want? Where are you going? Why are here? Of course there are Star Wars, Star Trek, Stargate SG-1 (REALLY good system for whipping up worlds and adventures quickly on the fly, though it is d20 3.x (I see that as a con)), and others. Star Wars & Star Trek are the mostly widely known settings, though more recent versions are a lot more fluff and action, and lacking in a lot fo ways, but in an RPG setting this could possibly be improved. Though I own it, I haven't actually run the newer Star Wars system, I mostly ran the old d6 version (and enjoyed). I liked the old FASA Star Trek better than the later versions, but of course those are not only long out of print, but very difficult to track down. Any other better Science Fiction settings/systems folks could suggest, that are as accessible as Middle-earth is to Fantasy, and with a decent system that includes behavior modification and encouragement to play more "heroic" type play and discourage "murder hobo" chaos player styles, built into the system and setting the way TOR and AiMe are? For horror, I am thinking Call of Cthulhu, latest d6 version, 1920s setting (though all the other settings are an option, including modern)? I don't think Vampire/Werewold/World of Darkness/Etc is a very appropriate system/setting for most of our clientelle, though for research it is of course interesting to consider. For Super Heroes, ? I am thinking maybe something like Agents of Shield setting from our existing program plans, but what system? For a Western system, I'm not aware of anything that is truly a straight western cowboy style system since Boot Hill. Anyone have any other suggestions? For murder mystery type? Historical system/settings? Modern military system/settings? (I really like Twilight 200, but doesn't meet criteria for being published, and doesn't have built-in behavioral tools alas). Other genres? I look forward to everyone's suggestions. Happy Gaming! -Hawke        
Located in Community Discussion / / The RPG Research Project Discussion / Standardization of systems/settings for research, therapies, and education
satanic cults.php
by Hawke Robinson published Apr 29, 2017 last modified Apr 29, 2017 02:51 PM — filed under:
Located in Archives / / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research) / Full Text Documents Waiting for permission to publish publicly
cult fbi
by Hawke Robinson published Apr 29, 2017 last modified Jun 27, 2020 02:31 PM — filed under: , ,
Located in Archives / / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research) / Full Text Documents Waiting for permission to publish publicly
Interactive Complexity Coding
by Hawke Robinson published Jan 08, 2017 — filed under: ,
Where this will be accepted is still unclear, but it is something I came across during my time with Play Therapy, that seems very appropriate for Recreation Therapy / Therapeutic Recreation (RT / TR) and possibly some forms of RPG Therapy. It might only be applicable for mental health clients. I ran it by several professors, and facilities managers, and they were intrigued, but unable to provide further clarification. I welcome additional feedback from others.
Located in Blog
RPG Handbook Wiki Original Source Document
by Hawke Robinson published Nov 09, 2016 last modified Jul 05, 2020 06:32 AM — filed under: , ,
Here is the source document that is being converted to the wiki version of the RPG Handbook of Practice.
Located in Archives / / RPG Handbook / Wiki Version