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Social Workers’ Perceptions of the Association Between Role Playing Games and Psychopathology
by Hawke Robinson published Oct 04, 2017 — filed under: , , , , , , , , , ,
Whereas role-playing and table-top role-play games (RPGs) have been proven to have potential as therapeutic tools, playing RPGs is often stereotypically associated with social incompetence and psychiatric disorders.
Located in Blog
Old Research Repository
by Hawke Robinson published Aug 16, 2017 last modified Mar 21, 2019 02:48 PM
This is RPG Research's older research repository. We are currently moving more than 3,000 content items (1 multi-page essay equals 1 content item) from this old site to our new repository at www.rpgresearch.com/research . The new repository is better organized and formatted, but it takes months for our volunteers to move all this content from the old site to the new site, so we are keeping the old repository available until the move is complete. All new research is being added to the new repository, no new research is being added to this old repository as of 2018.
RPG Research on SpoCon Panel, Psychology of Gamers and Hackers from the Information Security Perspective
by Hawke Robinson published Aug 15, 2017 last modified Jun 13, 2018 05:13 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , , ,
Here is the audio recording from the SpoCon 2017 panel on "Psychology of Gamers and Hackers". Panelists included: Dr. Mark Rounds and Hawke Robinson.
Located in Blog
RPG Research on SpoCon Panel, Role-Playing [Gaming] as Therapy
by Hawke Robinson published Aug 15, 2017 last modified Aug 15, 2017 05:15 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , ,
Here is the audio recording from the SpoCon 2017 panel on "Role-Playing [Gaming] as Therapy". Panelists included: Gail Glass (Recreation Therapist), John Welker, and Hawke Robinson.
Located in Blog
About The RPG Research Project Community Website (All on one page).
by admin last modified Aug 14, 2017 09:25 PM — filed under: ,
This community-focused website began with efforts, starting initially around 1985, and advancing since 2004, to identify the effects of role-playing games upon participants. Furthermore research efforts consider the potential uses of RPGs as intervention modalities to achieve educational and therapeutic goals for diverse populations. RPG Research is loose consortium of contributors and completely volunteer-run.
Located in About
RPG Research at Spocon 2017 Panels with John Welker and Hawke Robinson
by Hawke Robinson published Aug 06, 2017 last modified Aug 08, 2017 12:50 PM — filed under: , , , ,
John Welker and Hawke Robinson will be participating in a number of panels at this year's 2017 SpoCon in Spokane, Washington, August 11-13. If you are interested, here is the schedule...
Located in Blog
litlist
by Hawke Robinson published Aug 01, 2017 last modified May 14, 2018 03:48 PM
Located in Archives / / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research) / Full Text Documents Waiting for permission to publish publicly
A Visual History of RPG Research, RPG Therapeutics, the RPG Trailer, & The RPG Bus
by Hawke Robinson published Jul 28, 2017 last modified Aug 06, 2019 05:40 AM
Here are some snapshot photos from the RPG Research Project since 2004.
Located in About
GeekCulture An Annotated Interdisciplinary Bibliography
by admin published Jun 21, 2017 — filed under: , , , , , , ,
Sure games are fun. Yet the play that's built into them does not make them false; it makes them psychologically truer even than everyday life. Games can Solve major crises, train war heroes, and civilize us all. What the world needs is not less time for playing games but more.
Located in Archives / / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research) / Full Text Documents Waiting for permission to publish publicly
Wanna Play?
by admin published Jun 21, 2017 last modified Jun 21, 2017 09:22 AM — filed under: ,
Sure games are fun. Yet the play that's built into them does not make them false; it makes them psychologically truer even than everyday life. Games can Solve major crises, train war heroes, and civilize us all. What the world needs is not less time for playing games but more.
Located in Archives / / 1. Primary List of Documents for Research on RPGs (Others' Research) / Full Text Documents Waiting for permission to publish publicly